Podflix & Chill
Podflix & Chill

Episode · 6 months ago

Newly Nomads - Chillin' with Andrea Hixson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Andrea Hixson is an independent filmmaker, who lives and works full time from her RV with her husband and fellow content creator, Tyler, and their guinea pig, Mose. We sit down and chat about her brand-new documentary Newly Nomads, which follows their first year of full time life on the road. Andrea shares

  • Some of her favorite places to visit
  • What boondocking is and how it has empowered them to take ownership of their lives
  • The trials and tribulations of attempting to distribute her independent film to streaming services

Stream Newly Nomads for free on YouTube.

Check out the Wild Hixsons vlog, blog and more.

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Begin Pot fix network transmission inthree two one. What's going on guys welcome back toanother episode of Pod Flix and chill did you know that Yuture is the secondmost visited website behind Google and it's the second most used social mediasite behind face book now. This might sound like an advertisement for youtube, but I promise you it's not. You Tube Users Watch a combined total ofapproximately one billion hours of video every single day and that'sbillion with a bee. In fact, back in September, Neflis CEOread hastings set in an interview that he considers his top two competitors tobe sleep and Yout, so you can't really have a conversation about the streamingwars without first talking about the original streaming site. Yout. Ontoday's episode of the Podcast, I got a chance to sit down and chat with theindependent, filmmaker Andrea Hickson, about her feature length, documentarynewly nomads which permuted on you tube back in March of this year. Thedocumentary follows Andrea, her husband, tyler and their Guinea pig mose as theymake the transition from a quote: Unquote normal life style in a Denver,Colorado apartment into living and working full time in an RV. Thedocumentary was very well done and I highly encourage anyone consideringmaking a transition into a nomadic lifestyle to check it out or to checkout Andrea and tyler at wild hicksons. That's H. I X S O N S, com, I'll linkit down in the show notes. But what I really found interesting about ourconversation was the process that Andrea had to go through in terms oftrying to distribute her documentary to the traditional streaming platforms.She highlights a number of issues that independent filmmakers and contentcreators are facing when they're trying to mass produce something so that theirideal audience can see it. And while we didn't come up with any answers for thequestions that we posed, I think it's great for independent filmmakers andcontent creators to start to have these conversations so that companies, likeyou, tube, like Hulu and even like Netlik, can start to better address theneeds of this group of people and make sure that their content also gets seenand heard. So without further ADO. Let's talk newly nomads with Andrea,Hickson, Hi Andrew Welcome to Polix and chill. How are you doing today? I amgreat, thank you so much for having me. Oh No thank you for reaching out. Iwatched the documentary and I, like I said I have so many questions abouteverything, but I know you wanted to talk a lot about the filming and thedistribution process of it. So I want to to it in with that, and my firstquestion is: Why did you decide to film this process of you know transitioningyour whole life into an RV yeah, that's a really great question, because it wasnot easy and there are a lot of times where I was like. Why am I doing thisand you know, I think the biggest reason isthat you can only start this lifestyle once and there are so many things thatwe learned in that first year that I was like if I'm going to do adocumentary about this like it's got to be now, but you know that was difficult becauseI had never done like a full scale project like that before I had donelike dance films. That was like the big thing that I did before that because Iwas a dancer and I was like I don't know, I was kind ofgetting out of the dance problem. I was looking for something just like a newtype of project to do, and then I mean, what's there not to film, you know whenyou start traveling full time. It's like it's perfect. It's a perfectopportunity to do a new type of film, so yeah yeah. That's I D. do it awesome?So you went in with the intentions of like sort of making this a documentary.It wasn't just like for your personal records or anything yeah. I actuallyoriginally wanted to do a dace series...

...and have like six different episodes. Ivastly miscalculated how much footage I would need to make that happen, and soI wait and I started editing and it was. I decided earlier on that early on theediting process that I wanted to make him documentary just because I thoughtit would just flow a little bit better and then I was like. I don't know whatI was thinking. I don't have nearly enough footage to make this like aseries like I wasn't even close, so that actually leads into one of myother questions. How much footage did you actually film for this document?Because it's seventy five minutes? It's a little over some yea minutes. It's in terms of storage. I have twopoint three terrabine of footage: Yeah, a lot of that is like, like full motorcycle, rides and stufflike that. So it's just like that. You have a lot of space, but I did undatedup using what actually went into thedocumentary was like a terro bite of finish, but it's just like there'sthere's a lot yeah. So a lot of storage face yeah. I can imagine that now forthe motorcycle rides, which I thought were really cool, because you just mento see your point of view way like a go pro or did you guys justhave use yeah, awesome yeah. So there's a there's like this. This, like mountthat you can put on we put on Tyler's helmet and it's just like command stripon the go. Projes sits right on that yeah, okay, yeah. I know that one we Ithe day before our honeymoon I went out and I bought a go pro and like a bunchof yes and things because I didn't want tobe carrying around my phone in Hawaii. You know I wanted to be able to justlike stick to go pro on like a chess piece or like a head piece as Goofy asit looks and just be able to enjoy the view yeah. No, I love to go far. I thinkit's such a great way to like not be stuck behind a camera as your livinglife. Like that, I felt like that's a really hard part about the document.Enery is like, I was really having trouble balancing. You know. I want tojust actually live this as well, but I'm also recording all of it and like Ihave a passion for recording it and photographing it so like that's kind ofa hobby as well and like a thing to do, but at the same time I feel like I'mnot fully experiencing it right, that's a really ongoing process. I can imaginethat balance out yeah. I can imagine that, but you did. I know you mentionedone point in the documentary. You said that one of the parks- I guess that youvisited that you- you checked it out ahead of time, like you went a coupleof different times to be able to figure out when to go when I was in thelighting and a way, so I'm sure that's like a nice way to balance it, becauseyou get to experience it first and then right. That is a that's a good way todo that. I really like doing it that way a lot of times, but then there areother times or were we just don't have time to do that and so we're just kindof like scrambling. You know like I just get, what footage there is yeahand I really loved to just seeing all of the different landscapes and placesthat you guys went. I think it's really not thought about as much how muchthere is to see in the continental, United States. You know in these fortyeight states here yeah. I know you, I would always feellike you have to go like so far to see so many different things, but like evenall the different mountains that we went to like you think mountain is amountain right, but they all look so different. They all feel so differentwhen you're there yeah. That is really cool. What what was one of yourfavorite spots? I know you said in documentary white sands. Is that stilltrue, that is still definitely one of myfavorite spats yeah. Honestly, people asking that- andI have like a list of ten places and I have such a hard time narrowing it down. I also really like my wad from thedocumentary and then since then, we've been to theGrand Canyon and Upper Peninsula of...

Michigan, which are also two of myfavorites. Okay. I rely like both of those as now is there any spot that youhaven't been that's on your list? Yes, it's! I don't know why. I'mobsessed with the glacier national park in Montana, I think when we like, whenwe boone Docto Montana, I just got it in my head, I'm like obsessed withMontana now an I don't know why I just I think it's really pretty and there'snot very many people there, which is very probably part of the appeal rightexactly so yeah. I really want to get up there, but it's so out of the way. Idon't know when we're going to be able to do it. You know it's like basicallyon the border with Canada right we'll see, yeah, I think one of thelast times I talked with Tyler, I recommended Maine. So if you guys everfind your way out to is like when you get to the upper part of Maine, it'slike foresty, it's verly isolated. I barely had any cell service when I wasup there, but it was Bateman yeah. We haven't done anything in the northeast,I'm really intimidated by it, because it's much more crowded and there's fromwhat I've heard there's a lot more like not height, friendly roads and tunnelsand kind of things like that. So that is intimity to me, but I'm sure we'llget out there sometime yeah yeah. I definitely recommend at least the NewEngland area. It's much prettier than yeah. You Know New Jersey, sure so of of your journey in the first year. What do youthink was maybe like one of the hardest adjustments that you had to make tolife in an ARV yeah? I think. Well, I think there's really tothat. Stick out to me, which is one of them, is that everything that you do innormal life, just there's just a couple more steps in an ARV, so everythingjust takes a little bit longer so like we don't have a dishwasher, so we washall our dishes my hand. You know we don't have a vacuum. We sweep and wehave h a lot of steps that we have to go through to pack up and set up andwe've gotten that down to about. I don't know what a good day we can doall of the inside on the outside in an hour before we go and then set up isfaster than that. But yeah I mean it's like I don't knowyou don't you think about that there are going to be extra things to do, butthey stack up a lot and it can get kind of difficult. But I think thatwhat I really like about that is that it kind of forces you to take ownershipof the things that you do in your life and like responsibility for them, andyou actually have to understand, like I understand the, how our take systemworks and it's nasty. But I understand it. You know- and wehad like just those things that you don't normally have to look at innormal life. You kind of have to look at them here yeah, but it's that tradeoff you know and then I think the other part wouldbe traveling. I mean traveling takes up somuch time and it's basically like a second job, and I didn't think aboutthat, but like planning, where you're going to go next, like finding just thegeneral area and then we're going to stay there where the grocery stores are,you know if we have work to do there and then also what you want to see andthen on top of that again, the packing up and leaving and setting up and allthat it's it takes a lot of time yeah, but it yeah. I really enjoyed it, though it'sfun, but I don't know I think if we were busier, it would be a lot morestressful. You know if we hadn't had like a really good work, life balance.It would be really difficult yeah and that's that's something that I reallyenjoyed watching and I'm just kind of like fascinated by your ability to likehave that work. Life Balance. I think it's something that a lot of peoplestruggle with, so this situation that you and tyler have sort of carved outfor yourselves is, I don't think repeatable for a lot of people like. Idon't think I could replicate it, and I just really like I'm fascinated withhow you two are able to do right. Yeah. We definitely have a very uniquesituation because we own our own...

...companies and we've owned it for fiveyears. So we are really deep in that. But you know there are a lot of fulltimers who work remote and if you get a job that isn't hourly a lot of times,you can kind of batch your work and do a little bit more like that. But what makes our work life fount sogreat is that we have a really incredible team behind us. So mostlywhat we get to focus on are those in person. You know filming sessions withour clients, because that's the that's the thing that only we can do right. Sowe get to mostly focus on that and focus on. The Wild Tax is brand whichwe're doing now, yeah, that's great, and so from that have you found thatyour own company has grown as you've developed, sort of wild Hickson's brand,as well as like the strangers worth meeting brand. That's interesting! Most of our claims.Don't really know about that good part of the brand they get they get excitedwhen we tell them and they're like Oh wow, like I'm, going to check you up,but we work mostly with actually bird centers and natural birth professionals,a natural health people, so they're just like kind of not in that world most of thetime. But I do think that our living in anArve has made us just more able to see more people and to be more flexiblewith people schedules, and so I think that has helped us just kind of withthe logistics of our clients very cool. I like that, so speaking of getting to meet a wholebunch of new people and different people, obviously you're in a bunch ofdifferent cities like constantly or maybe not. Maybe you decide to you knowor some where for a couple of months right when you go and you tell people thatyour full time or vers, what sort of like the general reaction from peopledo? Are they like? Do they think you're weird? Do they even care like? Do theyhave a yeah questions for you, yeah, honestly, it's like a it's areally good ego boost, because everybody is like wow that is so cool.I wish I could fo that and I like every time I just feel like Oh yeah, we're socool. You know, but it's really it's nice to hear that and people do have alot of questions for us. You know like how do you make it work and like wherehave you been what your favorite places and things like that, but yeah, it's mostly positive. It'smostly really a fun thing to say to people, and sometimes it does get old.You know because people are like where re you from and you're like. I live inan ARV and they're like whoa and then there's a whole conversation instead ofjust like yeah, I'm from Denver Right and the conversation. But that's justme because I'm an introvert, but that's too funny yeah, that's very cool,though yeah and do you do you find it like alot of when you guys go to the R v Parks and things like that? Are there alot of younger people that do it around your guys is age? No! No! We! I actually, I don't think we've met a singleotherperson, our age at an Ivy Park, wow yeah wow. I think we've seen so when wewere been backing in Montana. There was another couple that was closer to ourage. That was like next to us, but besides that, it's all, at least likeyou know s and up the tires, and so are those the people that choose to do itfull time because, obviously, like you think R v like my first lot, is Oh roadtrip for vacation, not necessarily something to live out of so do you findit that yeah its group is like full timers? Yes, so the the yeah, the retires arethe ones who are all full time and they are just like living their best lives,they're, always in such great moods when you talk to them to their eyes,really happy. But you know it's a lot of that and then it's a lot of you knowthose weekend trippers like families with young kids and things like thatyeah, I would say those are the two of the biggest age groups that we meet andthat the older folks that we talked to...

...are always fun. We always joke where westay in Tucson. It's we're really not supposed to stay there supposed to belike forty five an up, but since we're like quiet, they don't mind, but the the retires party like wayharder than we do there like up late and like laughing and yell it. They arejust having a blast and we're like ready to go to bed at nine, like, I believe that my inlaw's dock, theirboat down along the Jersey shore- and they have you- know everybody on thedocks older, like s or retired, and they party every single weekend so yeah.I believe it, I believe, can you guys see yourselves doing thisfor the rest of Your Life Arvin and living out? Your no mad best self lives yeah? I don't think for the rest of ourlives, but I think for a while, like at least five more years, probably butyeah I mean, I think there are just so many different things that we want todo with life, that this is. This is a really fun thing to do now, and wedefinitely aren't done with it. We haven't seen nearly enough yet orbesides, that we're still doing a lot of work. While you do this but yeah, I definitely think for a longtime. Still it's awesome. It's cool that you guys are able to have thatconversation and you see it throughout the the documentary. I love like sortof the symbiotic relationship that you guys have of being able to work witheach other and just feed off of each other. You know you can tell to that like this.Is Your Passion Projects, the documentary but Tyler's there to support you like ahundred and ten percent, probably even more than yeah yeah, which is which is funny becauseyou know you guys mentioned in the documentary, but for the listeners youknow they. You guys got married and then the next day sort of embarked onthis journey and yeah that's kind of a big ask for a relationship. You know itis yeah. You know. I think I should have specified this in the documentary,because that that makes it seem a little bit more intense than it was. Wehad been together for six years already right. So you know: We've been livingtogether for four years and had been like we were basically married. I justwant o official, but yeah I mean just in terms of like that weekend. That wasa big weekend. You know, because we had our whole wedding weekend and all ofthat we did a smaller wedding, so it wasn't like so crazy, but yeah, andthen the day after that, we were like all right. Let's get out of ourapartment, that's that's crazy and and travelingduring ovid to that that was probably challenging and interesting and anunforeseen thing that you guys had to deal with.Can you talk a little bit about that? Yeah Yeah? It was weird it was definitelyweird and especially because we hadn't been on the road for that long yet so,like that was when we first started hearing about coved. That was still atthe point where, like we hadn't tried things like boon backing, you know, sowe didn't know if our V parks shut down. What we were going to do and we'd heardsome like stories about it, but I mean a no. It ended up being totally finebecause we never had a problem finding a place to say, and we just ended upkind of like just waiting it out for a little while until the initial reallyscary stuff kind of passed over and we started to understand what we shouldand shouldn't do. But yeah I mean it was, it was scary,but I don't know. I think it was probably not really that much steriorfor us than anyone else and we have we both have really supportive family. Sowe knew if we needed to, we could just kind of dump the IRV and storage and golive with them. May We didn't want to do that? We wanted to keep you knowdoing the life on the road he's Bin, so much fun. Yeah, I mean it worked out and Iactually appreciated it that it was a good catalyst to get us Boondock,because we that's so intimidating for us, for youknow, people who had never done that before I never done our v life beforewe were kind of avoiding it. I think until that point, because we just feltintimidated not knowing how to do it,...

...but that was a good catalyst because itwas kind of like well you're not going to see anything else. You know youcan't go to any parks. You can't go to national park. You got to be really faraway from people, so I guess now it's the time to do it. Yeah. So can youtalk a little bit about boon docking for the people who haven't seen thedocumentary? Yet? Oh, yes, yes, Pon daching is staying out in the Boondocks so out on just really wide open spaces, a lot oftimes like a bureau of land management, land or Forest Service Land, and youcan camp there for free and then the challenging part about that is thatthere's no hook ups, which would be like your water, your steward andelectric. So you have to really be self sustained. The interesting thing about that isthat, like you, look on instar and like everybody who lives in an Vor van likethat's all that they do and that's how it seems anyways, and so I don't knowit just like what everybody else is door like should be fine, but it's alot of work to do on Daget, there's like a lot of prep that goes into itand you have to really watch. You know your power and your water,especially for us, because we don't have like sixteen solar panels and likereally expensive batteries or anything like that. So yeah. We like that the are park lifewith kind of like weekend ben backing trips to kind of weave both of those inso we can be normal people as well. I don't know how people do thatconstantly, like that seems exhausting yeah. I can only imagine I just watchedafter watching your documentary. I was so intrigued by the nomad life that Iwatched no mad land. The movie that came out last year actually haven'tseen that I should. I should watch that I recommend it's a little bit differentof a perspective of it. You know the main characters, town, basically, thezip code just goes away. The the state says: Hey this, isn't where you liveany more, so she's sort of like forced to like live in her van. Oh, my Gosh Yeah. So it's more like I guess you could call it the grittyversion of no madding yeah, but that movie, you know, and it's same thing-it's a bunch of older people. They actually got some real life nomadsinvolved with the project, so so they're featured in the film but yeah.It is a lot of self sustaining. You know going to the bathroom and buckets you know not a lot of people have thepower or anything like that. It's yeah crazy, yeah o. That is not how I would like toYan, because it's like, I feel like that's the thing about like living on.The road is like when it's your decision. It's super empowered, it'samazing and when it's not your decision, it's got to be the worst thing in theworld yeah. I can imagine that, but you know the the movie to it to its point:had some positives because everybody in the community, you know you see thecommunity aspect of no matting and one of the lines, as you know that they never say good. Bye, there's,never a final good by on the road. It's always see down the road because atsome point or another you're going to yeah you're going to like meet themsomewhere else in your journey, and I think that's a really cool positivemessage. You know for life, but also for the no matting lifestyle. You knowyou've a come back to several places that you've been so right, yeahprobably run into those people again but another another quote that reallystood out to me from that movie that I wanted to bring up and then ask youyour thoughts on it. So the the sister of the main character. You know themain character runs into some van trouble and she has to stay with hersister and she says the sister says you know growing up. People always thoughtyou were kind of weird or you know eccentric, but I know that you werejust braver and more honest than everybody else and I wonder at a Lee itis, but it makes me wonder like do youthink that that is what...

...you know. That's part of the nomad lifestyle. Do you think, would you entirely consider yourselves more brave or morehonest than other people not like trying to to your own horn type ofright? No, I you know Tyler always likes tocall a scrappy. I don't yeah, we will pretty much make anything work I meanthat's. We met in school where we were both. He was heading a like. A studentrun theater and I was like creating a new method ofchoreography and I had a bunch of people, so we were about like doinglike our own thing. That's how we met and how we kind of started doing this so yeah I mean, I think that we're bothreally determined and we both like learning for ourselves. So I think we were really hard, headed and we'll justkind of make whatever we want to do happen, but yeah I mean it. I think it doestake some courage to live the nomad life because it is superweird to not have like just kind of normal access to things or like, like Ikind of joke about like if I'm in a new town and my phone dies like I don'tknow how to get home or, like you know like. If you don't,if you don't know everything about where you're going, it can't be scary,and if you have to take your RV and for Pairslicly, we haven't had to do that because we have an amazing relationshipwith the manufact manufacture of our views, but I mean yeah, there's a lot more,that you're at the mercy of on the Roan Yeah and then so to follow up with that. Howdid that relationship come about in the within the whole process of filmingdocumentary? I was really curious about that, and then we can talk more aboutthe actual getting the documentary to moute and all that stuff. Okay, yeah yeah, so actually with the therelationship with East West, so they are the ones who manufacture these they. I was just doing some photography.Just kind of I was trying to build, like my social media, to promotedocumentary a little bit just because I like photography and they just theyreally liked the photos that I was taking and they you know they were likehey. This is great. Do you want to like work with us and we were like? Yes also.We are professional digital marketers and I'm making a documentary and theywere like. That's great, that's good! Yes, I knowso we you know they just kind of saw the photos and then we ended up being areally great fit, for it is so now yeah. So now, what we're doing is they put usin the new RV each year? And we just make content about that, and webasically get a free house is pretty cool that is really cool so like and-and it works out for you because, like you're getting you're giving themcontent, whether that's like articles or photos or videos, or what have youand then you also get to promote like how living on the road can be, which isgreat exactly exactly and we get fancy new R vs. I mean, like we have a TVthat hides in to the counter top and he comes back out. It's that's cool is thething: Is Fancy Yeah? That's that's fancier than anything I have in myapartment. So again I know you wanted to talk alot about the the distribution process and as well as the filming process ofthis. So what was that like? Because I know you said it was not what youexpected yeah. So I had a really great plan when Iwent in to to the kind of planning stages of the documentary that I wasgoing to self distribute on Amazon, so Amazon, video direct is like a reallygreat platform for independent filmmakers, because you can just Polishthere and you don't have to pay any fees, they'll just look at it and thenthey'll put it up there and you get like like pennies per vew. You know,but you at least get to be on a reputable platform and like get alittle bit of money. So that was my plan and I was reallyexcited about it and then,...

...when it came time to start, you knowthinking about actually getting a documentary ready to release. I noticed that Amazon stopped taking non fiction words, so I was interestedin that and I googled a little bit more about it. I kind of did some researchand it seems like they just are done with documentaries. They do not wantany more documentaries, they're, taking them down off of their sight, so yeah,so it kind of leaves independent documentary filmmakers, just kind oflike I don't know like figure it out. So after that I was looking at, youknow, going through an aggregatory, a distributor, and that is crazy process. So you have to submit your trailer andthen they'll like talk with you about whether or not they want to work withit everywhere. We looked was about twothousand dollars to get it on to a platform yeah two sand dollars- and I was likethat is so expensive, like there's no backers on this project, this is medoing something with like zero budget. I paid my friend and colleague for the music, andthat was the whole budget. You know it was awesome. Sound track was great, yes,Denman, a middle class fashion, she's amazing. I love her so much and yeah so like I was like I don'tlike me: It's not like. We couldn't afford it, but I'm just like man likedo. I really want to pay two and dollars, and that would be just to getit on like Amazon, Prime Kulu and Apple TV.So still not Netlik. You know still not like the biggest of the big and then itthat doesn't even guarantee that, like anybody's going to see it yeah so arisk for you know unknown return, yeah exactly, and then you know with thatthey're like a bunch of hidden fees. That's like! Oh! We are going to do thecaptions, even though I already had captions and they're going to cut. Youknow whatever scene, to play as the trailer, but it's not an actualtrailer and then there's also like a year. We fee just to keep it up there,like you, have to pay every year, yeah, it's crazy, so it really is just kindof like you have to buy in to the club kind of thing so yeah I mean so I we thought about that for a long time,because I mean it just I don't know if it's like a pride thing or if it's justlike I just wanted to be on a like a quote: Unquote, recut ble platform, but ultimately we decided to go with you tube, because I decide it was more important for peopleto see it than for it to be. You know, on whatever platform, so we put somemoney towards some ads for you tube instead of two thousand dollars star,putting it on a brim and that actually performed really well for us. So thedocumentary, I think, with those ads it kind of kick started it and ended upreally getting a lot more attention than I even expected on mouture. So I'mreally glad that we went that route, but you tube has its own issues. Oh boy,so I know here we go so when I first upfloated the documentary toYoutte. It got flagged with copyright issues for the music, which isobviously false, because I commissioned all of it from a great artist out of StLouis and so yeah. We we were like. Oh it's, probably fine,it's probably just a mistake, so we lick, you know I forget exactly what itis, but it's the like a peal that type of thing exactly so we were like yeahthey'll figure out. It's obviously not this music, not even close to thatmusic. So we'll just click a peal and then we release the documentary. Youknow we did that hope from here and got you know the ball rolling on gettingsome attention and the company that was flag for thecopyright upheld the copyright. So they looked at it. They said no, this is it,and this is a thing that happens with you tube. So these massive, like musicdistribution companies, will just flag...

...independent filmmakers content ashaving their music they'll, uphold it, and then there's literally nothing thatyou can do as the filmmaker yeah. If you, the only course of action, youhave is to click that appeal betton again to which the music, you know thebig music producer can immediately take down your video just like that yeah and there's no one to talk to youknow you can get lawyers involved, but even those cases that I saw themwinning was like okay, we'll take it down and put it back up and we won'tflag at this time. So you still lose all of the traction that you've gotyeah. So it's crazy. I mean you know, that's the that was the only option forus to really make any money off of this project that I worked really hard onand I don't even know how much of it they're taking now, because it's nowlisted as a cover of some song that they flagged wow. I see I didn't noticeit when I checked it out, so I end of it that is pretty messed up yeahbecause I I say like there's, there's no way to monetize it because,obviously, like it's still up you're still getting views, you're stillgetting comments on it, yea, but so yeah. So what we have right now,it's called a like profit sharing, so we are getting some of the profit andthen some of it is going to this company. But I don't know what thesplit is. So I don't really like. Probably they you know, I don't elightand it's like if, like a two minute section of the like seventy sevenminute documentary- and I just I'm just like imagining that they're taking likeninety percent of the revenue lie- that's scary, yeah. I know it is yeahthe music industry's like a whole separate like monster yeah, but I didn't know that about the youknow, distribution fees and everything to get to get films up on other yeah streaming sites. and I wonder if thatholds true to like these other publishing companies as well, that a they put video up there. It'scrazy, though yeah it's interesting too, because you know, obviously the othercourse of action is then to go to film festivals, but a lot of that is justlike you paid to a min and you're not going to get chosen or somethingbecause it's still kind of that you know paid a play thing right so and howmany people are in on festivals, these days, yeah exactly yeah wheneverything's at the click of a button or the press of a finger. You know notmany people are going to go to a film festival check out a new film right andeven the people that do go are just other filmmakers. So it's not. It stillwouldn't be like reaching the audience that I you know I M and hearing thefilm toward so I'm I'm upset, but I'm glad that we went with you tube. Youknow. I think I think a lot more people saw and have seen the film than wouldhave other ways so yeah. I agree: Do you think that that this is like thefuture of? I guess you could call it the future ofstreaming? If you will, because I mean you tube- is one of thebiggest streaming platforms in the biggest social media platforms. So cameout right so, but you start to see a lot more of filmmakers, puttingdocumentaries and putting their their works on you tube is. Do you see thatas the future? Just because it's much more accessible or yeah? I hope so. Youknow, because I really something about just the idea of havingto pay as just an independent filmmaker who, like I'm, not a millionaire BroHaving to pay to get my you know my movie on a platform. I just don't likethat. I doesn't sit well with me, so I hope that you know you tube is where alot of independent filmmakers are going. I think it is especially you know forthe ones who can maybe kind of swallow that prideaspect of like needing to be on Amazon or whatever right, and the other thingis that you know you tube now does have. Like actual you know, Black Bestermovies that you can rent,...

...so I I think it would be amazing ifthey ended up making it so that filmmakers could submit their project.As like a film like that, yeah, it's like rentable or things like that. Ididn't see anywhere how to do that. But I also know that that's pretty new, sothat that might be something that they're doing. I hope so that would becool. I think that would be cool yeah yeah, especially for, like you, said,the independent Creator who's in you know you can only do so much becauseI'm trying to build out the yout brand for for potlike and chill as well, andit's like yeah it's very. They make it very hard to do the things that youwant to do. You know unless you have like a certain subscriber account orlike you're willing to pay money or all these other things and it's they make.You know just putting it out there extremely difficult, yeah yeah. A lotof social media is like that, like you, just have to hit this golden numberbefore you're allowed to do anything, yeah yeah, it's a pain in the one likewell. How am I going to hit the number if you're not going to? Let me do haveother things like you got to help me out here, yeah, throw me a bone. Do Do you think there would be anyplans to do like a future documentary like a follow up maybe year two year,three yeah. I think that I definitely want todo more documentaries. I don't know about like doing another one in the RBI,because I don't really know like how many other stories that are here. Maybeif we do something like vastly different, I don't know like if we go abroad orsomething that would be pretty different yeah but yeah, I don't think I would do like ayear to follow up type thing. That's kind of I mean we're kind of doing thatalready because we have the rug yeah. I love that log videos too they're great.Thank you like O. It's act honestly. It's a perfect plan between thedocumentary and your dock series that you wanted to do just in more digestion,exactly yeah and now, since we have a marking to marking team. You know we onthe marketing company. We have a great team who helps us put all those out,because that I don't know that I applaud the the people who do it allthemselves. They put out regular logs they edit and do all that stuff that Idon't know how you keep up with that. I love my team for El. They edit allthose videos, yeah, I'm sure, that's definitely beneficial to you, guys,yeah and then talk to a little bit moreabout the the Arvo article like how did that come about too, because that'slike a pretty big deal right yeah, I know I I mean that was reallyfun. Yeah, it's the scrappy thing again. You know I was like hey mydocumentaries out, I'm going to email, everybody and let them know that it'sout. So I did that and yeah the Brennan whohe's so awesome th the questions that he asked for like really thoughtful. Iwas really impressed with that. I just keep telling everybody that, becauseI'm so impressed. I just expected, like these boiler, play boring questions andactually like watch the documentary yeah, so he was just like yeah. I, likethe documentary. I have some questions, and here you go. I also just to plugmyself a little bit more, have an article that I wrote coming out onWander Ley, which is another kind of full timing magazine and thatone's actually out now, but it's out just for pain, subscriber, so it'll befree at the end of the month. Okay, awesome yeah, you have a sene the linkso that we cannot share it. El. Thank you, yeah and that's a funnything, because I have like a whole list of notes here where, like wherever it,the like the Arvo article. Like still my questions, that's so funny,specifically about the pizza oven, like I thought that was so funny. Yeah likethat was one of the first things I notice something like that. Pizza ovenis so cool. I want it. I know we really need to like work harderto get ony to sponsor us, because we put that Peter Everywhere. No, no, welove it, though it's a honestly it like changes. The game with watfiee getsinto like nine hundred degrees and so e...

...h. You just put it in for like twoseconds that it's like done nice and crispy. It's really fun, okay, cool! So I'm going to do like acouple of. I guess you can call them rapid fire questions, but you can takea a the time to think about them. It's fine, okay, who who had the hardesttime adjusting to life in the ARV. You were tyler! Oh my Gosh! That's some putting me on this spot! I I want to say tyler, but I don't want to answer it for him,but I feel like a lot of the like adventurous stuff is a like. I want tobe out in nature all day and so that's kind of what I want to do with the RVand he likes to be more in like cities and kind of more like a home body solike he loves when we spend a month in Tucson. That's his vibe, but I love andwe're like bouncing around week a week and I do all the travel planning. So,okay, probably Tyler Yeah. So does he do more of the driving since you'redoing the planning he does yeah? He does all the driving,which I am totally fine. Without this you know chill in the passenger seatfor ten hours. Instead of having to like drive, Yeah Yeah Yeah, I thinkHannah, my wife would be the same way, she's perfectly fine. Being the DjaYeah Yeah Yeah Great TJ awesome do what's a what's one of Tyler's, likebiggest pet peeves or your biggest pet peeves of tyler, that you didn't mayberealize until life in the ARV with him. If he even has one he's a, I know he has now. He haspuppes with me because I just leave my stuff everywhere and since we're insuch a small space, now he's like you can't do it like there's nowhere to bethere's a like. You can't leave your stuff out, and I understand that andthat's fair. Oh Tyler Tyler likes the kitchen tohimself. So if I need to do something in the kitchen, while he's doingsomething in the kitchen, that's that's a difficult. I think that's oneof my pet pews, though, because I just want to be able to go in the kitchenwhen I want to go in the kitchen, but he's got like he's, got like this wholeflow, where he's like using all of the counter space and like everything atthe same time, and so if I go in there, I just totally ruin the flow. That's yea, I feel like that's. That'sme in the kitchen. You know I'm not a t, Uhu yeah, that's that's too funny. Okay,so I know with with travel with work. Obviously, and sometimeswhen you you guys, are boon docking, you might not always have like cellservice or Wifie or anything like that. But when you do, what is one of yourfavorite shows to stream since this a streaming podcast head last so which isso funny because that's the episode Tyler did yeah okay, but I will talk more aboutdetectors. I know he brought that up on. Okay, your show, but detector is, is myhands down? Favorite show it's it's just it's MC kenzie Crook he's thethe guy with the eye ball that comes out in parts of Caribbean, okay, yeah, so he but he's fantastic. Hedirected the and stars in it, and it's just about these metal detectors hobbyist, who andjust like kind of their normal life, and it's just like so serene, but it'sgot so much like good pearls of like life, wisdomin it. You know- and it's also funny so that is hands down. My favorite showdetectors and it's it's fiction. Well, just repeat it. Yeah, okay fiction,Yeah, interesting yeah! It's it's been long since off the air, but you know wejust keep just keep going back, doing it over and over again and he's a goodactor too. He was in game of thrones and yes, he was a pretty good bad guyin that, so I'll have to check that out. Where is that yeah or what it's onprime, okay, yeah and think it's on? Prime Yeah, the first two seasons, Ithink, are free, and actually we just...

...found it on the rook channel, I thinkor tub or something we started to doing something new. I don't know exactlywhat it was, but it somewhere well we'll find it in it yeah. So if, if Netlik called youup and said that they wanted to do a series based on you and your life andtraveling in the R V- and you got to pick who played you or tyler or bothwho would you pick? I Want Rachel McCabe to play me. I LoveRachel Macaws but she's like she's like fifteen years too old, but I think I still want her to play me. I don't know who would play Tyler. Maybe Charley Hundom I'd Go Kay, that'dbe good, that'd, be a good except for the with the like British accent, butyou know besides that right. Well, most British actors are pretty good at fakeandd, an English yeah American accent anyway right, okay, yeah. I will gowith that. I like that. Okay, I like that too, that's a good casting that'ssome weird age pairings, but other than that Okar. You know all the high schoolkids on TV are actually like in the thirties anyway, so right, exactly yeahpans out. So why don't you? Let people know where they can find you and Tyler,and the documentary and all that good stuff yeah. So we are the wild hicksons nowand that six in which, with an extra s so hix so n s and yeah, so we have the website. Youcan find us an instar face book, Yout, just search for wild pigins and we'reeverywhere. We also have a podcast, that's on SPATII and apple podcast andwherever you podcast, awesome, great and, of course, newly nomads. Thedocumentary is on outbent, it's only seventy seven minutes, so you know youcan bang that out no problem yeah nice evening. It really is like it was. Itwas so fun and, like the time flew by watching it, so it was yeah. It wasjust neat to sort of, like I said, be able to see parts of America that Ihaven't been to it's like. Oh, I don't. I don't need to travel to Hawaiiinstead on a plane for eight hours to see this crazy mountain range, becauseyou know it's right here, right right, yeah, I think of one of my favorite.Compliments is my friend who she's in the documentary with the little goldenretriever puppy, okay, Colorado. Her now has been. They just got marriedlast weekend. He wasn't going to watch documentarybecause he had other stuff to do and he's like. I like, I only watch alittle bit like I have to go and then he ended up watching the whole thing,and so that I feel like is a really good compliment. Also, yeah! That's agreat compliment. That's awesome, awesome! Well, Andrew. Thank you. Somuch for coming on and chatting with me, and I hope we get to do it again,sometime yeah. Thank you so much for having me, of course, last awesome, ourguys until the next episode. This is Andrew and this was poplin Shell, and that was the show. So if you guysare interested in learning more about the nomad lifestyle, you can check outwild the hicksons com. THAT'S H! I X S, O N S, com, follow them on Instar atWild Hickson's and be sure to check out the newly nomads feature lengthdocumentary right on you tube. If you want to check out the movie, No madland that is now streaming on Hulu and stars, Francis macdoine, as always, youcan follow me on social media at pot, Flix, the letter n and chill that's pot,Flix and chill. I would love to hear from you in the comment section or inmy messages about what your favorite part of this episode was, or what you'dlike to hear me cover next on the next episode of Pot Flax and chill I'm goingto be talking with one of my close...

...friends. Kevin who is obsessed withStar Wars- and we are going to be breaking down the bad batch for you, somake sure you hit that subscribe button. So you stay notified for when thatepisode drops until next time. I'm Andrew- and this has been potfull. You've been listening to a podcast ofthe bod fixed network, discover more audible, gyms, like this at podfuls,make sure to catch up to the minute networks and Antians by following atPod, fix on twitter official underscore pot fix on Insara at Pod, fix networkon face book and make sure to subscribe to Plod fix, presents wherever youchoose to find poncas The pot fix network artist owned an luck t.

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