Podflix & Chill
Podflix & Chill

Episode · 1 year ago

Newly Nomads - Chillin' with Andrea Hixson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Andrea Hixson is an independent filmmaker, who lives and works full time from her RV with her husband and fellow content creator, Tyler, and their guinea pig, Mose. We sit down and chat about her brand-new documentary Newly Nomads, which follows their first year of full time life on the road. Andrea shares

  • Some of her favorite places to visit
  • What boondocking is and how it has empowered them to take ownership of their lives
  • The trials and tribulations of attempting to distribute her independent film to streaming services

Stream Newly Nomads for free on YouTube.

Check out the Wild Hixsons vlog, blog and more.

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Begin pod fix network transmission in three, two, one. What's going on, guys? Welcome back to another episode of Pod flicks and chill. Did you know that Youtube is the second most visited website behind Google, and it's the second most used social media site behind facebook? Now this might sound like an advertisement for Youtube, but I promise you it's not. Youtube Users Watch a combined total of approximately one billion hours of video every single day, and that's billion with a bee, in fact. Back in September, Netflix CEO read hastings set in an interview that he considers his top two competitors to be sleep and Youtube. So you can't really have a conversation about the streaming wars without first talking about the original streaming site, Youtube. On today's episode of the Podcast, I got a chance to sit down and chat with independent filmmaker Andrea Hickson about her feature length documentary newly nomads, which premiered on Youtube back in March of this year. The documentary follows Andrea, her husband Tyler and their Guinea pig MOS as they make the transition from a quote unquote, normal lifestyle in a Denver Colorado apartment into living and working full time in an RV. The documentary was very well done and I highly encourage anyone considering making a transition into a nomadic lifestyle to check it out or to check out Andrea and Tyler at www dot wild hicksons. That's hi x sonscom. I'll link it down in the show notes. But what I really found interesting about our conversation was the process that Andrea had to go through in terms of trying to distribute her documentary to the traditional streaming platforms. She highlights a number of issues that independent filmmakers and content creators are facing when they're trying to mass produce something so that their ideal audience can see it. And while we didn't come up with any answers for the questions that we posed, I think it's great for independent filmmakers and content creators to start to have these conversations so that companies like Youtube, like Hulu and even like Netflix can start to better address the needs of this group of people and make sure that their content also gets seen and heard. So, without further ado, let's talk newly nomads with Andrea Hickson. Hi Andrea, welcome to pot flicks and chill. How are you doing today? I am great. Thank you so much for having me. Oh, no, thank you for reaching out. I watched the documentary and I, like I said, I have so many questions about everything, but I know you wanted to talk a lot about the filming and the distribution process of it, so I want to jump right in with that and my first question is, why did you decide to film this process of, you know, transitioning your whole life into an Rv? Yeah, that's a really great question, because it was not easy and there are a lot of times where I was like why am I doing this? You know, I think the biggest reason is that you can only start this lifestyle once and there are so many things that we learned in that first year that I was like, if I'm going to do a documentary about this, like it's got to be now. But you know, that was difficult because I had never done like a full scale project like that before, right. I had done like dance films. That was like the big thing that I did before, like I was a dancer and I was like, I don't know, I was kind of getting out of the dance world and I was looking for something just like a new type of project to do, and then, I mean, what's there not to film? You know, when you start traveling full time, it's like it's perfect. It's a perfect opportunity to do a new type of film. So yeah, yeah, that's why I'm going to do it. Awesome. So you went in with the intentions of like sort of making this a documentary. It wasn't just like for your personal records or anything. Yeah, I actually...

...originally wanted to do a docu series and have like six different episodes. I vastly miscalculated how much footed I would need to make that happen, and so I went in and I started editing and it was I decided earlier on, the early on an editing process, that I wanted to make a documentary just because I thought it would just flow a little bit better. And then I was like, I don't know what I was thinking. I don't have nearly enough footage to make this like a series. Like it wasn't even close. So that actually leads into one of my other questions. How much footage did you actually film for this documentary? Because it's seventy five minutes. It's a little over some yeah minutes. It's a in terms of storage. I have two point three terabytes of footage. Yeah, a lot of that is like like full motorcycle rides and stuff like that. So it's just like that eats up a lot of space. But I did end up end up using what actually went into the documentary was like a terabyte of footash. But it's just like that. There's there's a lot. Yeah, so a lot of storage space. Yeah, I can imagine that. Now do for the motorcycle rides, which I thought were really cool because you just get to see your point of view right like a go pro. Or did you guys just have use? Yeah, awesome. Yeah, so there's a there's like this this like mount that you can put on. We put on Tyler's helmet and it's just like command strip. Okay, the go pro just sits right on that. Yeah, okay, yeah, I know that one we I the day before our honeymoon, I went out and I bought a go pro and like a bunch of yes and things, because I didn't want to be carrying around my phone in Hawaii. You know, I wanted to be able to just like stick to go pro on like a chess piece or like a head piece, as Goofy as it looks and just be able to enjoy the view. Yeah, no, I love a go pro. I think it's such a great way to like not be stuck behind a camera as you're living life like that. I felt like that's a really hard part about the documentary. Is Like I was really having trouble balancing, you know, I want to just actually live this as well, but I'm also recording all of it and like I have a passion for recording and photographing it. So like that's kind of a hobby as well and like the thing to do, but at the same time, I feel like I'm not fully experiencing it. Right, that's a really ongoing process. I can imagine that balance out. Yeah, I can imagine that, but you did, I know you mentioned one point in the documentary. You said that one of the parks, I guess that you visited that. You you checked it out ahead of time, like you went a couple of different times to be able to figure out when to go, when it was in the lighting and all. Yeah, yeah, I'm sure that's like a nice way to balance it because you get to experience it. Yeah, first and then right, that is a that's a good way to do that. I really like doing it that way a lot of times within there are other times whe where we just don't have time to do that and so we just kind of like scramblely, you know, like I just get what footage there is. Yeah, and I really loved to just seeing all of the different landscapes and places that you guys went. I think it's really not thought about as much how much there is to see in the continental United States, you know, in these forty eight states here. Yeah, I know you I would always feel like you have to go like so far to see so many different things. But like even all the different mountains that we went to, like you think mountain is a mountain, right, but they all look so different, they all feel so different once you're there. Yeah, that is really cool. What was one of your favorite spots? I know you said in the documentary white sands. Is that still true? That is still definitely one of my favorite spots. Yeah, honestly, people asking that and I have like a list of ten places and I have such a hard time marrowying it down. I also really like Moab from the documentary, and then since then we've been to the Grand Canyon and Upper Peninsula of Michigan, which...

...are also two of my favorites. Okay, I really like both of those as well. Is there any spot that you haven't been that's on your list? Yes, it's. I don't know why. I'm obsessed with the glacier national park in Montana. I think when we like when we boon doc to Montana, I just got it in my head. I'm like obsessed with Montana now and I don't know why. I just I think it's really pretty and there's not very many people there, which is very probably part of the appeal, right exactly. So, yeah, I really want to get up there, but it's so out of the way I don't know when we're going to be able to do it. You know, it's like basically on the border with Canada. Right, let's see. Yeah, I think one of the last times I talked with Tyler I recommended Maine. So if you guys ever find your way out to me, I was like when you get to the upper part of Maine, it's like foresty. It's very isolated. I barely had any cell service when I was up there, but it was pesome. Yeah, yeah, we haven't done anything in the northeast. I'm really intimidated by it because it's much more crowded and there's from what I've heard, there's a lot more like not height friendly roads and tunnels and kind of things like that. So that is intimidating to me, but I'm sure we'll get out there sometime. Yeah, yeah, I definitely recommend at the least the New England area. It's much prettier than so. Yeah, you know New Jersey. Ye, sure. So of of your journey in the first year, what do you think was maybe like one of the hardest adjustments that you had to make to life in an RV? Yeah, I think. Well, I think there's really two that stick out to me. which is one of them is that everything that you do in normal life just there's just a couple more steps in an RV. So everything just takes a little bit longer. So, like we don't have a dishwasher, so we wash all our dishes by hand, you know. We don't have a vacuums, we sweep and we have a lot of steps that we have to go through to pack up and set up and we've gotten that down to about, I don't know, on a good day, we can do all the inside and the outside an hour before we go and then set up is faster than that. But yeah, I mean it's like, I don't know, you don't you think about that. There are going to be extra things to do, but they stack up a lot and it can get it kind of difficult. But I think that what I really like about that is that it kind of forces you to take ownership of the things that you do in your life and like responsibility for them, and you actually have to understand, like I understand how our take system works and it's nasty, but I understand it, you know. And we had like just those things that you don't normally have to look at in normal life. You kind of have to look at them here. Yeah, but it's that tradeoff, you know. And I think the other part would be traveling. I mean traveling takes up so much time and it's basically like a second job, and I didn't think about that. But like planning where you're going to go next, like finding it, just the general area, and then we're going to stay there, where the grocery stores are, you know, if we have work to do there, and then also what you want to see, and then on top of that again, the packing up and leaving and setting up and all that. It's it takes a lot of time. Yeah, but it yeah, I really enjoy it though. It's fun, but I don't know, I think if we were busier it would be a lot more stressful, you know, if we hadn't had like a really good work life balance, it would be really difficult. Yeah, and that's that's something that I really enjoyed watching and I'm just kind of like fascinated by your ability to like have that work life balance. I think it's something that a lot of people struggle with. So this situation that you and tyler have sort of carved out for yourselves is, I don't think, repeatable for a lot of people. Like I don't think, yeah, I could replicate it, and I just really like I'm fascinated with how you two are able to do right. Yeah, I we definitely have a very unique situation because...

...we own our own company and we've owned it for five years, so we're really deep in that. But you know, there are a lot of full timers who work remote and if you get a job that isn't hourly, a lot of times you can kind of batch your work and do a little bit more like that. Sure, but what makes our work life found so great is that we have a really incredible team behind us. So mostly what we get to focus on are those in person, you know, filming sessions with our clients, because that's the that's the thing that only we can do right. So we get to mostly focus on that and focus on the wild hixon's brand, which we're doing now. Yeah, that's great. And so from that, have you found that your own company has grown as you've developed sort of wild Hickson's brand as well as like the strangers worth meeting brand? That's interesting. Most of our clients don't really know about that. Okay, part of the brand. They get they get excited when we tell them and they're like Oh wow, like I'm going to check you out. But we we work mostly with actually birth centers and natural birth professionals and natural health people. So they're just like kind of not in that world, yes the time. But I do think that are living in an RV has made us just more able to see more people and to be more flexible with people's schedules, and so I think that has helped us just kind of with the logistics of our clients. Very cool. I like that. So, speaking of getting to meet a whole bunch of New People and different people, obviously you're in a bunch of different cities like constantly. Well, or maybe not. Maybe you decide to you know, somewhere for a couple of months. Right when you go and you tell people that your full time rvers, what sort of like the general reaction from people do are they like, do they think you're weird? Do they even care, like, do they have actions for you? Yeah, honestly, it's like a it's a really good ego boost because everybody is like wow, that is so cool. I wish I could do that, and I like every time I just feel like, Oh yeah, we're so cool, you know. But it's really it's nice to hear that and people do have a lot of questions for us, you know, like how do you make it work and like where have you been? What's your favorite places and things like that, but yeah, it's mostly positive. It's mostly really a fun thing to say to people and sometimes it does get old, you know, because people are like where you're from and then you're like, I live in an RV and they're like Whoa, and then there's a whole conversation instead of just like yeah, I'm from Denver, right, and conversation. But that's just me because I'm an introvert. But that's too funny. Yeah, that's very cool though. Yeah, and do you do you find it like a lot of when you, when you guys go to the RV parks and things like that, are there a lot of younger people that do it around your guys's age? No, no, we I actually I don't think we've met a single other person our age at an Rv Park. Wow, yeah, wow, I think we've seen so. When we were boon baking in Montana there was another couple that was closer to our age that was like next to us. But besides that, it's all at least like, you know, F S and up retires. And so are those the people that choose to do it full time? Because obviously, like you think, Our v like my first thought is, Oh, road trip for vacation, not necessarily something to live out of. So do you find that that? Yeah, it's group is like full timers. Yes, so, the the yeah, the retirees are the ones who are all full time and they are just like live in their best lives. They're always in such great moods when you talk to them through their eyes, really happy. But yeah, it's a lot of that and then it's a lot of you know, those weekend trippers, like families with young kids and things like that. Yeah, I would say those are the two of the biggest age groups that we meet and that the older folks that we talked to are always fun. We always joke...

...where we stay in Tucson. It's that we're really not supposed to say they're supposed to be like forty five and up, but since we're like quiet, they don't mind. But the the retirees party like way harder than we do. They're like up late and like laughing and yelling and they are just having a blast and we're like ready to go to bed at nine. Like yeah, I believe that. My inlaws dock their boat down along the Jersey shore and they have, you know, everybody on the docks older like FIF s or retired, and they party every single weekends. So yeah, I believe it. I believe. Can you guys see yourself doing this for the rest of your life? Are being and living out your nomad best self lives. Yeah, I don't think for the rest of our lives, but I think for a while, like at least five more years probably. But yeah, I mean we I think there are just so many different things that we want to do with life that this is this is a really fun thing to do now and we definitely aren't done with it. We haven't seen nearly enough yet and sure, besides that, we're still doing a lot of work while we do this. But yeah, I definitely think for a long time still. It's awesome. It's cool that you guys are able to have that conversation and you see it throughout the the documentary. I love like sort of the symbiotic relationship that you guys have of being able to work with each other and just feed off of each other. You know, you can tell to that, like this is your passion project, the documentary, but Tyler's there to support you like a hundred and ten percent, probably even more than that. Yeah, which is which is funny because you know, you guys mentioned in the documentary, but for the listeners, you know they you guys got married and then the next day sort of embarked on this journey and yeah, that's kind of a big ask for a relationship. You know, it is. Yeah, you know, I think I should have specified this in the documentary because that that makes it seem a little bit more intense than it was. We had been together for six years already, right, so, you know, we've been living together for four years and had been like we are basically married or just like yeah, official. But yeah, I mean just in terms of like that weekend, that was a big weekend, you know, because we had our whole wedding weekend and all of that. We did a smaller wedding, so it wasn't like so crazy, but yeah, and then the day after that we were like all right, let's get out of our apartment. That's that's crazy. And and traveling during covid to that that was probably challenging and interesting and an unforeseen thing that you guys had to deal with. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yeah, yeah, it was weird. It's definitely weird, and especially because we hadn't been on the road for that long yet. So like that was when we first started hearing about covid that was still at the point where, like we hadn't tried things like boon backing you know. So we didn't know if our vparks shut down, what we were going to do and we'd heard some like stories about it. But I mean all it ended up being totally fine because we never had a problem finding a place to say and we just ended up kind of like just waiting it out for a little while until the initial really very stuff kind of passed over and we started to understand what we should and shouldn't do. But yeah, I mean it was it was scary, but I don't know, I think it was probably not really that much sterier for us than anyone else. And we have, we both have really supportive family, so we knew, yeah, if we needed to, we could just kind of dump the RV and storage and go live with them, and we didn't want to do that. We wanted to cute, you know, do in the life on the road because it's so much fun. Yeah, I mean it worked out and I actually appreciated it that. It was a good catalyst to get US boon docking, because we that's so intimidating for us, for you know, people who had never done that before and never done RV life before. We were kind of avoiding it, I think until that point because we just felt intimidated not know knowing how to do it. But that was a good catalyst...

...because it was kind of like well, you're not going to see anything else, you know, you can't go to any parts, can't go to national parks, you gotta be really far away from people. So I guess now it's the time to do it. Yeah, so can you talk a little bit about boondocking for the people who haven't seen the documentary yet? Oh, yes, yes, boon docking is a staying out in the Boondocks, so out on just really wide open spaces, a lot of times like bureau of Land Management Land or for service land, and you can camp there for free. And then the challenging part about that is that there's no hookups, which would be like your water, your steward and electric, so you have to really be self sustained. The interesting thing about that is that, like you look on Instrut Graham and like everybody who is in an Rvr van, like that's all that they do and that's how it seems anyways, and so I don't know, you'd just like well, everybody else has doen, you like should be fine, but it's a lot of work should boond I get there's like a lot of prep that goes into it and you have to really watch, you know, your power and your water, especially for us because we don't have like sixteen solar panels and like really expensive batteries or anything like that. So, yeah, we like that the RV Park life with kind of like weekend bundaking trips to kind of weave both of those in so we can be normal people as well. I don't know how people do that constantly like that. Seems exhausting. Yeah, I can only imagine. I just watched after watching your documentary, I was so intrigued by the nomad life that I watched nomad land, the movie that came out last year. Actually, haven't seen that. I shouldn't. I should watch that. I recommend it's a little bit different of a perspective of it. You know, the main characters town. Basically the ZIP code just goes away. The the state says hey, this isn't where you live anymore. So she's sort of like forced to like live in her van. Oh my gosh. Yeah, so it's more like, I guess you could call it the gritty version of no madding. Yeah, but that movie, you know, and it's same thing. It's a bunch of older people. They actually got some real life nomads are involved with the project. So so they they're featured in the film. But yeah, it is a lot of self sustaining, you know, going to the bathroom in buckets. You know, not a lot of people have the power anything like that. It's, yeah, crazy. Yeah, well, that is not how I would like to yeah it, because it's like, I feel like that's the thing about like living on the road is like when it's your decision, it's super empower it's amazing, and when it's not your decision, it's got to be the worst thing in the world. Yeah, I can imagine that. But you know, the the movie, to it to its point, had some positives because everybody in the community, you know, you see the community aspect of nomadding and one of the lines is, you know, that they never say goodbye. There's never a final goodbye on the road. It's always see you down the road because at some point or another you're gonna, yeah, you're gonna like meet them somewhere else in your journey, and I think that's a really cool, positive message, you know, for life but also for the nomadding lifestyle. You know, you've, yeah, come back to several places that you've been so right. Yeah, probably run into those people again. But another another quote that really stood out to me from that movie that I wanted to bring up and then ask you your thoughts on it. So the sister of the main character, you know, the main character, runs into some van trouble and she has to stay with her sister and she says, the sister says. You know, growing up, people always thought you were kind of weird or, you know, eccentric, but I know that you were just braver and more honest than everybody else and I wonder. So sweet it is, but it makes me wonder it.

Like, do you think that that is what you know, that's part of the nomad lifestyle? Do you think? Would you and Tyler consider yourselves more braver, more honest than other people? Not like trying to toot your own horn type of right, right, no, I you know, Tyler always likes to call a scrappy. I didn't. Yeah, we will pretty much make anything work. I mean that's we met in school where we were both he was heading a like a student run theater and I was like creating a new method of choreography and I had a bunch of people. So we were all about like doing like our own thing. That's how he's met and how we kind of started doing this. So yeah, I mean I think that we're both really determined and we both like learning for ourselves. So I think we were really hard headed and we'll just kind of make whatever we want to do happen. But yeah, I mean it. I think it does take some courage to to live the nomad life, because it is super weird to not have like just kind of normal access to things or like, like I kind of joke about, like if I'm in a new town and my phone dies, like I don't know how to get home or like, you know, like if you don't, if you don't know everything about where you're going, it can't be scary. And if you have to take your RV and for Pairs. Luckily we haven't had to do that because we have an amazing relationship with the manufact manufacture of our vis but I mean, yeah, there's a lot more that you're at the mercy of on the road. Yeah, and then so to follow up with that, how did that relationship come about? In the within the whole process of filming documentary. I was really curious about that. And then we can talk more about the actual getting the documentary to Youtube and all that stuff. Okay, yeah, yeah, so actually, with the relationship with east to west, so they're the one to manufacture our vs. They I was just doing some photography, just kind of I was trying to build like my social media to promote documentary a little bit, just because I like photography, and they just they really liked the photos that I was taking and they, you know, they're like hey, this is great. Do you want to like work with us? And we were like yes, also, we are professional digital marketers and I making a documentary, and they were like yeah, that's great, that's good. Yes, you know, so we you know, they just kind of saw the photos and then we ended up being a really great fit for it. That's so now. Yeah, so now what we're doing is they put us in the new RV each year and we just made content about that and we they really get a free house. Just pretty cool. That is really cool. So, like and and it works out for you because, like you're getting you're giving them content, whether that's like articles or photos, or videos or what have you. And then you also get to promote like how living on the road can be, which is great. Exactly, exactly, and we get fancy new RV's. I mean like we have a TV that hides into the countertop and it comes back out. It's that's cool. This thing is fancy. Yeah, that's that's fancier than anything I have in my apartment. So again, I know you wanted to talk a lot about the distribution process and as well as the filming process of this. So what was that like, because I know you said it was not what you expected. Yeah, so I have a really great plan when I went in the to the kind of planning stages of the documentary that I was going to selfdistribute on Amazon. So Amazon video direct is like a really great platform for independent filmmakers because you can just publish there and you don't have to pay any fees. They'll just look at it and then they'll put it up there and you get like like pennies per view, you know, but you'll at least get to be on a reputable platform and like get a little bit of money. So that was my plan and I was really excited about it and then when it came time to...

...start, you know, thinking about actually getting a documentary ready to release, I noticed that Amazon stopped taking nonfiction words. So I was interested in that and I googled a little bit more about it. I kind of did some research and it seems like they just are done with documentaries. They do not want any more documentaries. They're taking them down off of their site. So yeah, so it kind of leaves independent documentary filmmakers just kind of like, I don't know, like figure it out. So after that I was looking at you know, going through an aggregator distributor, and that is crazy process. So you have to submit your trailer and then they'll like talk with you about whether or not they want to work with it. Everywhere we looked was about two thousand dollars to get it onto a platform. Wow, yeah, two thousand, and I was like that is so expensive, like there's no backers on this project. This is me doing something with like zero budget. I paid my friend and colleague for the music and that was the whole budget. You know, she was awesome. Soundtrack was great. Yes, Jan, mole zone of middle class fashion. She's amazing. I love it so much. And Yeah, so like I was like, I don't like me. It's not like we couldn't afford it, but I was like, man like, do I really want to pay two thousand dollars? And that would be just to get it on like Amazon Prime, Kulu and Apple TV. So still not Netflix, you know, still not like the biggest of the big and then that doesn't even guarantee that like anybody's going to see it. Yeah, so risk for you know, unknown return. Yeah, exactly. And then you know, with that they're like a bunch of hidden fees. That's like, Oh, we're going to do the captions, even though I already had captions, and they're gonna cut you know whatever seen to play as the trailer, but it's not an actual trailer. And then there's also like a year leafee just to keep it up there, like you have to pay every year. Yeah, it's crazy. So it really is just kind of like you have to buy in to the club kind of things. So yeah, I mean so I we thought about that for a long time because, I mean it just I don't know if it's like a pride thing or if it's just like I just wanted to be on a like a quote unquote reputable platform. But ultimately we decided to go with Youtube because I decided it was more important for people to see it than for it to be, you know, on whatever platform. So we put some money towards and ads for Youtube instead of Twozero, toward putting it on a brideway, and that actually performed really well for us. So the documentary, I think with those ads that kind of kickstarted it and ended up really getting a lot more attention than I even expected on Youtube. So I'm really glad that we went that route. But Youtube has its own issues. Oh boy, so I know, here we go. So when I first upload of the documentary to Youtube, it got flagged with copyright issues for the music, which is obviously false because I commissioned all of it from a great artist out of St Louis. And so yeah, we we were like, oh, it's probably fine. They put it's probably just mistake. So we clicked, you know, I forget exactly what it is, but it's the appeal type thing exactly. So we were like, yeah, they'll figure out it's obviously not. This music is not even close to that music, so we'll just click appeal and then we release the documentary. You know, we did that hope from here and got, you know, the ball rolling on getting some attention, and the company that was flagged for the copyright upheld the copyright. So they looked at it. They said no, this is it. And this is a thing that happens with youtube. So these massive like music distribution companies will just flag independent filmmaker's...

...content as having their music, they'll uphold it and then there's literally nothing that you can do as the filmmaker. Yeah, if you the only course of action you have is to click that appeal button again, to which the music you know, the big music producer, can immediately take down your video just like that. Yeah, and there's no one to talk to. You know, you can get lawyers involved, but even those cases that I saw them winning, was like, okay, we'll take it down and put it back up and we won't flag it this time. So so you still lose all of the traction that you've got. Yeah, so it's crazy. I mean, you know, that's the that was the only option for us to really make any money off of this project that I worked really hard on, and I don't even know how much of it they're taking now because it's now listed as a cover of some song that they flagged. Wow, I see, I didn't notice that when I checked it out. So I'll end of it. That is pretty messed up. Yeah, because I could say like there's there's no way to monetize it, because obviously, like it's still up, you're still getting views, you're still getting comments on it. But so, yeah, so what we have right now it's called a like profit sharing, so we are getting some of the profit and then some of it is going to this company, but I don't know what the split is, so I don't really probably you know right. And it's like it's flagged a two minute section of a like seventy seven minute documentary and I just I'm just like imagining that they're taking like ninety percent of the revenue. That's scary. Yeah, I know it is. Yeah, the music industries like a whole separate like monster. Yeah, HMM, but I didn't know that about the you know, distribution fees and everything to get to get films up on other, yeah, streaming sites, and I wonder if that holds true to like these other publishing companies as well. That, yeah, that put video up there. It's crazy though. Yeah, it's interesting too, because, you know, obviously the other course of action is then to go to film festivals, but a lot of that is just like you paid us some men and you're not going to get chosen or something, because it's still kind of that, you know, paid a plaything, right. So, and how many people are going to film festivals these days? Yeah, exactly, Ye know, when everything's at the click of a button or the press of a finger. You know, not many people are going to go to a film festival check out brand new film, right, and even the people that do go are just other filmmakers. So it's not it still wouldn't be like reaching the audience that I you know, I'm a hearing the film tour and so I'm I'm I'm upset, but I'm glad that we went with Youtube. You know, I think, I think a lot more people saw and have seen the film than would have otherwise. So, yeah, I agree. I do you think that that this is like a future of I guess you co could call it the future of streaming, if you will, because I mean youtube is one of the biggest streaming platforms in the biggest social media platforms. Say It came out right. So, but you start to see a lot more of filmmakers putting documentaries and putting their their works on Youtube is do you see that as the future, just because it's much more accessible or yeah, I hope so, you know, because I really something about just the idea of having to pay at as just an independent filmmaker who, like I'm not a millionaire, right, having to pay to get my, you know, my movie on a platform, I just don't like. That doesn't sit well with me. So I hope that, you know, Youtube is where a lot of independent filmmakers are going. I think it is especially, you know, for the ones who can maybe kind of swallow that pride aspect of like needing to be on Amazon or whatever, right. And the other thing is that, you know, Youtube now does have like actual blockbuster movies that you can rent.

So I think would be amazing if they ended up making it so that filmmakers could submit their project as like a film like that. Yeah, that's like rentable or things like that. I didn't see anywhere how to do that, but I also know that that's pretty new, so that that might be something that they're doing. I hope so. That would be cool. I think that would be cool. Yeah, yeah, especially for, like you said, the independent creator, who's right. You know, you can only do so much, because I'm trying to build out the youtube brand for for pod flicks and chill as well, and it's like, yeah, it's very they make it very hard to do the things that you want to do, you know, unless you have like a certain subscriber account or like you're willing to pay money or all these other things, and it's they make, you know, just putting it out there extremely difficult. Yeah, yeah, a lot of social media is like that, like you just have to hit this golden number before you're allowed to do anything. Yeah, yeah, it's a pain in the blood. Like well, how am I going to hit the number if you're not going to let me do every other things? Like you gotta help me out here. Yeah, throw me a bone, really do. Do you think there would be any plans to do like a future documentary, like a follow up, maybe year two, your three? Yeah, I think that I definitely want to do more documentaries. I don't know about like doing another one in the RV, just because I don't really know like how many other stories are here. Maybe if we do something like vastly different? MMM, I don't know, like if we go abroad or something, that would be pretty different. Yeah, but yeah, I don't think I would do like a year to follow up type thing. That's kind of I mean we're kind of doing that already because we have these vlog yeah, I love that. Blog videos too. They're great. Thank you. It's act. Honestly, it's a perfect blend between the documentary and your Docu series that you wanted to do, just in more digestible ones. Exactly. Yeah, and now, since we have a marketing tea marketing team, you know, we own the marketing company. We have a great team who helps us put all those out, because that I don't know that I I applaud the people who do it all themselves. They put out regular vlogs, they edit and do all that stuff that. I don't know how you keep up with that. I love my team for some thing edit all those videos. Yeah, I'm sure that's definitely beneficial to you guys. Yeah, and then talk to a little bit more about the rvcom article, like how did that come about to because that's like a pretty big deal, right. Yeah, I know, I mean it was really fun. Yeah, it's the scrappy thing again. You know. I was like Hey, my documentaries out, I'm going to email everybody and let them know that it's out. So I did that and yeah, the Brennan who was so awesome, the the questions that he asked for, like really thoughtful. I was really impressed with that. I just keep telling everybody that because I'm so impressed. I just expected like these boilerplate boring questions and yeahctually like watch the documentary. Yeah, so he was just like yeah, I like the documentary, I have some questions and here you go. I also, just just to plug myself a little bit more, have an article that I wrote coming out on Wanderley, which is another kind of full timing magazine, and that one's actually out now, but it's out just for paid subscribers, so it'll be free at the end of the month. Okay, awesome. You. You have to send me the links so that we can share it. I will. Thank you. Yeah, and that's a funny thing because I have like a whole list of notes here where like where I wrote that, like the rvcom article, like stole my questions. That's so funny. Specifically, about the Pizza Ovin, like I thought that was so funny. Yeah, like there was one of the first things I noticed something like that. Pizza Ovin is so cool. I want it. I know we really need to like work harder to get any to sponsor us, because we put that because everywhere now. No, we love it, though. It's a honestly like changes the game with whati fired pizza because it could to too like nine hundred degrees, and so, yeah, you...

...just put it in for like two seconds. That is like done nice and crispy. It's really fun. Okay, cool. So I'm going to do like a couple of I guess you can call them rapid fire questions, but you can take the time to think about them. It's fine, okay. Who who had the hardest time adjusting to life in the RV? You were tyler. Oh my gosh, that's so putting me on the spot. I I want to say tyler. I don't want to answer it for him, but I feel like a lot of the like adventurous stuff is a like I want to be out in nature all day, and so that's kind of what I want to do with the RV, and he likes to be more in like cities and kind of more like a homebody. So, like he loves when we spend a month in Tu son. That's his vibe, but I love and we're like bouncing around week to week and I do all the travel planning. So okay, probably Tyler. Yeah, so does he do more of the driving since you're doing the planning? He does. Yeah, he does all the driving, which I am totally fine without this, you know, chill in the passenger seat for ten hours instead of having to like drive. Yeah, yeah, I think Hannah, my wife, would be the same way. She's perfectly fine being the DJ. Yeah, Yep, yeah, Great Dj. Yeah, awesome. Do what's up? What's one of Tyler is like biggest pet peeves, or your biggest pet peeves of tyler that you didn't maybe realize until life in the RV with him, if he even has one. He seems like a pretty normal I know he has. Now he has puppies with me, because I just leave my stuff everywhere and since we're in such a small space now, he's like, you can't do it, like there's nowhere to be there, isn't it? You can't leave your stuff out, and I understand that and that's fair. Oh, Tyler, tyler likes the kitchen to himself. So if I need to do something in the kitchen, wow, he's doing something in the kitchen. That's that's a difficult I think that's one of my pet peeves, though, because I just want to be able to go in the kitchen when I want to go in the kitchen, but he's got like he's got like this whole flow or he's like using all of the counter space and like everything at the same time, and so if I go in there, I just totally ruin the flow. That's yeah, I feel like that's that's me in the kitchen. You know, I've Uh Huh, yeah, that's that's too funny. Okay, so I know with with travel, with work, obviously, and sometimes when you you guys are boondocking, might not always have like cell service or wi fi or anything like that. But when you do, what is one of your favorite shows to stream, since this is a streaming podcast? Ted Lasts, though, which is so funny because that's the episode Tyler did. Yeah, okay, but I will talk more about detectors. I know he brought that up on okay, you're show but detectorist is my hands down favorite show. It's it's just it's Mackenzie Crook. He's the the guy with the eyeball that comes out in parts of Caribbean. Okay, yeah, so he but he's fantastic. He directed and stars in it and it's just about these metal detectorist hobbyists who and just like kind of their normal life and it's just like so serene, but it's got so much like good pearls of like life, wisdom in it, you know, and it's also funny. So that is hands down my favorite show, detectorist. And it's yeah, it's fiction. Will just repeat it. Yeah, okay, fiction. Yeah, interesting. Yeah, it's it's been long since off the air, but you know, we just keep, just keep going back doing it over and over again. And and he's a good actor to he was in game of thrones and yes, he was a pretty good bad guy in that. So I'll have to check that out. Where is that? Yeah, or what? It's on prime? Okay, yeah, I think it's on prime. Yeah, the first two seasons, I think, are free and actually we just found it on...

...the Roque Channel, I think, or to be or something. We started to doing something new. I don't know exactly what it was, but it's somewhere. Well, we'll find it. Bid. Yeah, so if if Netflix called you up and said that they wanted to do a series based on you and your life and traveling in the RV, and you got to pick who played you or tyler or both, who would you pick? I Want Rachel Accadens to play me. I Love Rachel accounts, but she's like she's like fifteen years too old, but I think I still want her to play v I don't know who would play Tyler. Maybe Charlie huntum. I'd go okay, that'd be good. That'd be a good except for the with the like British accent. But you know, besides that, right, well, most British actors are pretty good at fake and an English yeah, can accent anyway. Right, okay, yeah, we'll go with that. I like that. Okay, I like that too. That's a good casting. That's some weird age pairings, but other than that, who cares? Yeah, all the high school kids on TV are actually like in the s anyway. So right, exactly. Yeah, pans out. So why don't you let people know where they can find you and Tyler and the documentary and all that good stuff. Yeah, so we are the wild hicksons now and that sixes, which with an extra S. so, hi, Xso and s and yeah, so we have the website. You can find us on Instagram, facebook, Youtube. Just search for wild hixins and we're everywhere. We also have a podcast that's on spotify and apple podcast and wherever you podcast. Awesome, great and of course, newly nomads. The documentary is on Youtube. It's only seventy seven minutes, so you know, you can bang that out no problem. Yeah, Nice evening. It really is like it was. It was so fun and like the time flew by watching it. So it was. Yeah, it was just neat to sort of, like I said, be able to see parts of America that I haven't been too. It's like, Oh, I don't I don't need to travel to Hawaii and Stitt on a plane for eight hours to see this crazy mountain range, because you know it's right here right. Yeah, I think of one of my favorite compliments is my friend who she's in the documentary with the little golden retriever puppy. Okay, Colorado, her now husband. They just got me in last weekend. He wasn't going to watch the documentary because he has other stuff to do and he's I only only watch a little bit, like I have to go, and then he ended up watching the whole thing, and so that, I feel like it's a really good compliment also. Yeah, that's a great compliment. That's awesome, awesome. Well, Andrew, thank you so much for coming on and chatting with me and I hope we get to do it again sometime. Yeah, thank you so much for having me of course, last awesome. All right, guys, until the next episode, this is Andrew and this was pop flix and show and that was the show. So if you guys are interested in learning more about the nomad lifestyle, you can check out www dot wild the hicksonscom. That's hixsn s doc calm. Follow them on Instagram at Wild Hicksons and be sure to check out the newly nomads feature length documentary right on Youtube. If you want to check out the movie nomad land, that is now streaming on Hulu and stars Frances mcdormant. As always, you can follow me on social media at pod flakes, the letter N and chill. That's pod flakes and chill. I would love to hear from you in the comments section or in my messages about what your favorite part of this episode was or what you'd like to hear me cover next. On the next episode of pod flats and Chill, I am going to be talking with one of my close friends, Kevin, who is obsessed with Star...

Wars, and we are going to be breaking down the bad batch for you, so make sure you hit that subscribe button so you stay notified for when that episode drops. Until next time, I'm Andrew and this has been pod flicks and chill. You've been listening to a podcast of the pod fix network. Discover more audible gym's like this at pod fix networkcom. Make sure to catch up to the minute network shenanigans by following at pod fix on twitter, official underscore pod fix on Instagram, at pod fix network on Facebook, and make sure to subscribe to pod fix presents wherever you choose to find podcasts. The pod fix network artist owned and love.

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